The Apples Medical Centre – Library

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If you are pregnant and you-have genital herpes, which is with your gynecologist or midwife about how to manage the infection and minimize the risk of your child to talk. Read about diagnosing HIV for more information about getting tested for this condition. This may be a sign of a weakened immune system (the body’s natural defence against infection and illness), which may indicate you have HIV. If you are experiencing recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes you should also consider being tested for HIV. If you are experiencing recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes you should also consider being tested for HIV. Suppressive treatment may be restarted if you have further severe outbreaks. Suppressive treatment may be restarted if you have further severe outbreaks.

Suppressive treatment may be restarted if you have further severe outbreaks. Do you think that these factors could be a main cause as to why I am having recurring breakouts? As long as recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes are infrequent and mild, you will only need to take a five-day course of aciclovir as and when it is needed. As long as recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes are infrequent and mild, you will only need to take a five-day course of aciclovir as and when it is needed. As long as recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes are infrequent and mild, you will only need to take a five-day course of aciclovir as and when it is needed. As long as recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes are infrequent and mild, you will only need to take a five-day course of aciclovir as and when it is needed. As long as recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes are infrequent and mild, you will only need to take a five-day course of aciclovir as and when it is needed.


As long as recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes are infrequent and mild, you will only need to take a five-day course of aciclovir as and when it is needed. Suppressive treatment will usually be stopped after 12 months. It is important to note that while suppressive treatment can reduce the risk of passing HSV on to your partner, it cannot prevent it altogether. It is important to note that while suppressive treatment can reduce the risk of passing HSV on to your partner, it cannot prevent it altogether. This is known as suppressive treatment and aims to prevent further outbreaks developing. This is known as suppressive treatment and aims to prevent further outbreaks developing. This is known as suppressive treatment and aims to prevent further outbreaks developing.

This is known as suppressive treatment and aims to prevent further outbreaks developing. This is known as suppressive treatment and aims to prevent further outbreaks developing. If you have more than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, or if your symptoms are particularly severe and causing you distress, you may need to take aciclovir every day as part of a long-term treatment plan. If you have more than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, or if your symptoms are particularly severe and causing you distress, you may need to take aciclovir every day as part of a long-term treatment plan. This is known as episodic treatment. If you have fewer than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, your GP may prescribe a five-day course of aciclovir each time you experience tingling or numbness before symptoms begin. If you have fewer than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, your GP may prescribe a five-day course of aciclovir each time you experience tingling or numbness before symptoms begin.

If your symptoms are more severe, you may be prescribed antiviral tablets (aciclovir), which you will need to take five times a day for five days. If your symptoms are more severe, you may be prescribed antiviral tablets (aciclovir), which you will need to take five times a day for five days. If your symptoms are more severe, you may be prescribed antiviral tablets (aciclovir), which you will need to take five times a day for five days. Avoid wearing tight clothing because it may irritate the blisters and ulcers. Passing urine while sitting in a bath or while pouring water over your genitals may also help. Passing urine while sitting in a bath or while pouring water over your genitals may also help. This will make passing urine less painful.

Drink plenty of fluids to dilute your urine. Drink plenty of fluids to dilute your urine. Apply petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, or an anaesthetic (painkilling) cream, such as 5% lidocaine, to any blisters or ulcers to reduce the pain when you pass urine. Do not apply ice directly to the skin. It will also stop affected areas from sticking together. You should visit your GP if you have been diagnosed with genital herpes before and are experiencing a recurrent outbreak. For more information, see the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine or read our medicines information page.